Friday, July 19, 2024

Ramblin' 'round Georgia

South Georgia dirt road.

My favorite place to ramble was northeast, Georgia. But in the process of working on books and just general ramblin' 'round, I've managed to cover much of the state at one time or another and have seen many things that were of interest to me. I hope you will find them interesting also. These are more of what I call my "second tier" pictures.

As I've written before, the things that catch my eye are the old, the abandoned, the beautiful. The strange, the unusual. The off-beat, the quirky. I am a visual historian of mid-twentieth-century America and a recorder of the interface between man and nature; a keeper of vanishing ways of life.

City Hall, Hahira, Georgia.

 

Green doors on abandoned store, west central Georgia.

 

 Thunderbird for sale, southwest Georgia.

 

 Chattooga Trading Post, Chattooga County, Georgia.


Log shed and wagon, southeast Georgia.

 

Outhouse, south Georgia.

 

Georgian cottage, Barnesville, Georgia.
 
 
Yellow house, Sunbury, Georgia.
 
About the photos: These pictures were mostly made with a Canon EOS 5D Classic. One or two were made with a Canon EOS 20D, and one, the Chattooga Trading Post, was made on Fujichrome 100 film with a Canon EOS A2.

Signed copies of my book Backroads and Byways of Georgia are available. The price is $22.95 plus $3.95 shipping. My PayPal address is djphoto@vol.com (which is also my email). Or you can mail me a check to 8943 Wesley Place, Knoxville, TN 37922. Include your address and tell me how you would like your book inscribed.

Check out the pictures at my online gallery: https://davejenkins.pixels.com/  Looking is free, and you might find something you like.

Photography and text copyright 2023 David B.Jenkins.

I post Monday, Wednesday, and Friday unless life gets in the way.

Soli Gloria Deo -- For the glory of God alone.

Tags:   photography     travel    film photography    digital photography   Georgia    Canon EOS 5D camera     Canon EOS 20D camera    Canon EOS A2 camera   McLemore Cove    Fujichrome film

Wednesday, July 17, 2024

Why I Blog

 Cloudfall over brow of Lookout Mountain, McLemore Cove, Walker County, Georgia.
 
There are several reasons I blog. I like to share my life and experiences, I like to write about the art of photography, the tools we use, and about techniques that will help us make better pictures.  
Another reason I blog is to give my pictures life. You see, I feel that in order to have life, a picture needs to be seen. Not all my photographs have been published, so there are many that are not quite the right fit for publication, or they may be good, but not as good as another for a particular use.
But I love my pictures and enjoy them. That doesn't mean I think they are great, or that I'm a great photographer, but I think they deserve to be seen, to have life. So I publish them in books and magazines, and I blog. 
This is a group of what I would call second-tier photographs. They aren't my best ones, but they also deserve to be seen and enjoyed. I hope you will enjoy them too.
 
VW Karmann Ghia, west central Georgia.
 
Karma Newland, my all-time best assistant.
 
Confederate reenactor, Point Park, Lookout Mountain, Tennessee.
 
Man with hat, Dayton, Tennessee.
 
Little girl at playground, Greenville, South Carolina.
 
Red chair, Chickamauga Battlefield, Walker County, Georgia.
 
Lulu and Dancer, Deer Run Farm, McLemore Cove, Georgia.

Peekaboo! Lake Junaluska, North Carolina

 Photos: The photos were made at many different times in many different places with many different cameras. However, all were photographed on film except for the Karmann Ghia.

Signed copies of my book Backroads and Byways of Georgia are available. The price is $22.95 plus $3.95 shipping. My PayPal address is djphoto@vol.com (which is also my email). Or you can mail me a check to 8943 Wesley Place, Knoxville, TN 37922. Include your address and tell me how you would like your book inscribed.

Check out the pictures at my online gallery: https://davejenkins.pixels.com/  Looking is free, and you might find something you like.

Photography and text copyright 2023 David B.Jenkins.

I post Monday, Wednesday, and Friday unless life gets in the way.

Soli Gloria Deo -- For the glory of God alone.

Tags:   photography     film photography     Georgia    Tennessee     South Carolina    North Carolina   McLemore Cove    Volkswagen Karmann Ghia     Lookout Mountain

Tuesday, July 16, 2024

24 Hours in Mayalan (Repost)

The Mighty Cessna at the Mayalan Airstrip
 

(Reposted from March, 2020)

From the late 1970s to the early 1990s I had a relationship with the World Missions Department of the Church of God that took me to 26 countries on four continents and resulted in the production of more than 60 audio-visual programs to promote and raise funds for the Church's mission efforts.


In March, 1989, I met American missionary Frank Tyson and Guatemalan doctor Jaime Gomez at a small airfield high in the mountains of northern Guatemala. We loaded ourselves and some boxes of supplies into a small, single-engine Cessna, with Frank and Jaime sitting on the boxes because the back seats had been removed for hauling cargo and set off over some 8,000-feet-plus mountains to the highland village of Mayalan.

Our pilot, a Guatemalan "air cowboy," a spiritual kinsman of Alaskan bush pilots, was not one to waste fuel on higher altitudes. He skimmed the mountain tops so closely that I could have picked blossoms from the jacaranda trees. Nonetheless, he deposited us safely on the soccer field-cum-landing strip at Mayalan, fortunately catching it between games.
A warm welcome from the Mayalan villagers
includes water for washing hands.
 
After receiving a warm welcome from the villagers, we each went to our work. 
Jaime set up a clinic in the village church and Frank met with the village elders. I wandered around with my camera observing village life.
 
Dr. Jaime Gomez gives a mother diet
supplements for her undernourished infant.
 
Weaving in the traditional way.
 
Butchering a wild pig.
 
When evening came, there was a service in the church with Frank preaching. I put a Vivitar 283 flash on my camera and another on a lightweight stand and photographed the village believers at worship.   
 
A worship service at the Mayalan Church.
 
 After the service, it was bedtime. The church's "pews" were split logs mounted on short pegs. My bed was two of them placed side-by-side. Frank and Jaime had sleeping bags, but I, having not been forewarned, put on the warmest clothes I had, covered myself with my bathrobe, and settled in for the coldest, most miserable night of my life. (It gets very cold at night in the Guatemalan highlands!)
 
Sunrise at Mayalan
 
There was a silver lining, though. As the pre-dawn light began to filter into the church, I had absolutely no incentive to stay in bed! I was up and out with my camera as the sun rose, documenting the village as it came to life. I photographed the women cooking breakfast, the men going off to their fields, and the children beginning their school day.
 
The women at Mayalan cook breakfast on an open firepit.
 
  



The school at Mayalan provides nourishment for bright
young minds formerly doomed to illiteracy.
 
Kids and puppies are the same everywhere.
 
All too soon the air cowboy returned in his Cessna and it was time to leave. We had been in Mayalan for 24 hours and I had everything I needed to make one of my all-time favorite audio-visual programs.

But there was one final surprise: as we neared the end of the airstrip the engine faltered and we appeared about to drop into the very deep ravine at the end of the strip. But the little Cessna regained power and we were off. I hardly even noticed -- I was busy snapping aerial photos of the village.
Photographers are like that.
 
You can view the Mayalan A-V program here.

(Photographs made with Olympus OM cameras and lenses and a Vivitar 75-205 f3.8 zoom. Fujichrome 100D film.) 

Signed copies of my book Backroads and Byways of Georgia are available. The price is $22.95 plus $3.95 shipping. My PayPal address is djphoto@vol.com (which is also my email). Or you can mail me a check to 8943 Wesley Place, Knoxville, TN 37922. Include your address and tell me how you would like your book inscribed.

Check out the pictures at my online gallery: https://davejenkins.pixels.com/  Looking is free, and you might find something you like.

Photography and text copyright 2023 David B.Jenkins.

I post Monday, Wednesday, and Friday unless life gets in the way.

Soli Gloria Deo -- For the glory of God alone.

Tags:   photography     Travel    Guatemala      Fujichrome 100 film    Mayalan     Olympus OM camera     Vivitar lens    Missions

Friday, July 12, 2024

My Red Fetish

Red Volkswagen, Miami, 1969/70

I've loved the color red all my adult life. My favorite ties are red, my socks are red, black, and grey argyles, and, being a thorough-going obsessive-compulsive, I even have a red cover on my iPad and red paper clips on my desk. As I write this, I'm wearing a red T-shirt.

Naturally, all of this bleeds over into my photography. I gravitate to subjects with lots of red.

Two red chairs on farmhouse porch near Valdosta, Georgia, 2006.

Psychologists say people who love red are passionate and hot-headed. I don't think that's true of me. I consider myself easy-going, even-tempered, and relaxed. People who are hard-driving give me a pain. 

Red Chaise lounge, U.S. Highway 129, Irwin County, Georgia, 2010.

 This is more in line with my temperament. This red chaise lounge by a pond in south Georgia was so inviting I was tempted to park my car and sit awhile.

Civil War bugle. Chickamauga Battlefield, Walker County, Georgia, 1975.

 I apologize for using this photo in two posts in a row, but it's just about my favorite red photo and I couldn't leave it out. The color saturation of that Kodachrome film is amazing.

Starr's Mill, Georgia Highway 85 near Senoia, Fayette County, 2011.

And last, but by no means least, Starr's Mill. One the two most beautiful old mills in Georgia and one of my favorite compositions.

Photos: The red VW was photographed with my first good camera, a Nikon F and Kodachrome film. The photo of the bugle was made with a Nikkormat, also with Kodachrome. A Canon EOS 20D was used for the two red chairs, and a Canon EOS 5D for the red chaise lounge. Starr's Mill was photographed with the 12-megapixel Olympus E-PL1.

Signed copies of my book Backroads and Byways of Georgia are available. The price is $22.95 plus $3.95 shipping. My PayPal address is djphoto@vol.com (which is also my email). Or you can mail me a check to 8943 Wesley Place, Knoxville, TN 37922. Include your address and tell me how you would like your book inscribed.

Check out the pictures at my online gallery: https://davejenkins.pixels.com/  Looking is free, and you might find something you like.

Photography and text copyright 2023 David B.Jenkins.

I post Monday, Wednesday, and Friday unless life gets in the way.

Soli Gloria Deo -- For the glory of God alone.

Tags:   photography     Georgia    Nikon F camera     Kodachrome film    Canon EOS 20D camera    Nikkormat camera    Canon EOS 5D cameera     Olympus E-PL1 camera     old mills     Starr's Mill

Wednesday, July 10, 2024

Reliving the Civil War

A detachment of Confederate cavalrymen await the call to enter the battle.

 Over the years I've had a number of friends who participated in Civil War reenactments. They seemed to enjoy it a lot, going to various encampments and making sure their uniforms, guns, and other equipment were authentic.

Myself, I didn't see all that much fun in camping out in the heat and mosquitoes, wearing heavy woolen clothes on hot days, and marching back and forth. But to each his own.

  The lieutenant leads the charge.

But for me as a photographer, reenactments were a target-rich environment, with lots of people in costume doing their thing.

The first time I photographed one was in 1975. I was using a Nikkormat loaded with Kodachrome film and made the photographs below with that combination, including one of my all time favorites, the Civil War bugle. The two pictures at the top with made around 1990 with an Olympus OM2sp and probably, with a Tamron 100-300mm f4 lens.

A rifleman checks his weapon.

Reenactments were declining in popularity by 2010, but the 150th anniversary of the Civil War brought about a new surge of popularity, even though reenactments can no longer be held on battlefields controlled by the National Park Service, except living history reenactments.

The reenactments I photographed were held at the Chickamauga Battlefield in northwest Georgia, the site of an horrendous battle in 1863; a battle in which there were terrible casualties on both sides, and which neither side won.

A camp follower watches as the cooks prepare a meal.

Women are also involved in reenactments, as they were in the war itself. There were the "camp followers," of course, and sometimes the wives of soldiers traveled with them. (People were tougher in those days.) Researchers have also documented approximately 700 women who fought in the war as soldiers.

A soldier occupies his time between battles by practicing his concertina.

Many of the hobbyists who participate in reenactments do it for the activities and fellowship of camp life and as a welcome break from their everyday lives.

The bugle. One of my all-time favorite photos.

Signed copies of my book Backroads and Byways of Georgia are available. The price is $22.95 plus $3.95 shipping. My PayPal address is djphoto@vol.com (which is also my email). Or you can mail me a check to 8943 Wesley Place, Knoxville, TN 37922. Include your address and tell me how you would like your book inscribed.

Check out the pictures at my online gallery: https://davejenkins.pixels.com/  Looking is free, and you might find something you like.

Photography and text copyright 2023 David B.Jenkins.

I post Monday, Wednesday, and Friday unless life gets in the way.

Soli Gloria Deo -- For the glory of God alone.

Tags:   photography     Georgia    Civil War     Civil War reenactments    Chickamauga Battlefield  Nikkormat camera    Tamron 100-300mm lens     Olympus OMsp camera

Friday, July 5, 2024

Georgia Small Towns: Greenville

The Queen Anne-style Meriwether County courthouse was built in 1903.

 The west central Georgia town of Greenville was established in 1828 as the county seat of Meriwether County and named after Revolutionary War general Nathaniel Green. Although the population of 800 isn't all that much greater than Crawfordville's, it seems much larger. That may be because it has a courthouse square with shops and offices. 

The courthouse itself, a fine example of Queen Anne architecture, was built in 1903, one of the many erected during the two decades, 1890-1910, when there was a flurry of courthouse-building in Georgia.

 The distinctive Three Gables House was built in 1870.

 There is a number of fine, old homes in Greenville. Just a few blocks from the west side of the square is the unique Three Gables House, built by Confederate veteran Samuel Monroe Davidson. Other distinctive old houses include the Harmon-Watson-Matthews House, the Burwell Hill House, the Hiram Warner Hill House, and Twin Oaks. All of these are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. 

Stop by the Visitor Information Center on the north side of the square and pick up a driving tour brochure. You can even download a driving tour app for your cell phone.

The James Render House was the center of a 1900-acre plantation.

 One of the easiest to find is the James Render House, located about a half mile south of the square on U.S. 27ALT and Georgia Highway 41. Render, who came to Meriwether County about 1832, established a large cotton plantation and built a Plantation Plain-style home. By 1850 his holdings had expanded to 1900 acres, growing a variety of crops in addition to cotton. He had eleven children, and among his descendants have been a governor of Georgia and a Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court.

The Greenville Presbyterian Church was built in 1836.

About two miles north of town is the Greenville Presbyterian Church. The congregation was organized in 1829 and this building was erected in1836, at a time when the West Georgia area was very much raw frontier. The church has weekly services and the building is obviously lovingly maintained, with a modern parish house in the rear. The cemetery is older than the church—I didn’t spend much time looking, but I easily found a gravestone with a death date of 1818. 

(Adapted from my book Backroads and Byways of Georgia.)

Photos: A variety of cameras and lenses was used for these photographs. The courthouse and the James Render House were photographed with a Canon EOS 6D and the EF 28-105mm lens. The Three Gables House was photographed with the Fuji X-H1 camera and the Fujicron XC 16-50mm lens, and for the Greenville Presbyterian Church I used an Olympus E-M5 and the Panasonic Lumix G-Vario 14-140mm lens.

Signed copies of my book Backroads and Byways of Georgia are available. The price is $22.95 plus $3.95 shipping. My PayPal address is djphoto@vol.com (which is also my email). Or you can mail me a check to 8943 Wesley Place, Knoxville, TN 37922. Include your address and tell me how you would like your book inscribed.

Check out the pictures at my online gallery: https://davejenkins.pixels.com/  Looking is free, and you might find something you like.

Photography and text copyright 2023 David B.Jenkins.

I post Monday, Wednesday, and Friday unless life gets in the way.

Soli Gloria Deo -- For the glory of God alone.

Tags:   photography     travel    Georgia    Greenville     Meriwether County  Queen Anne architecture   Fuji X-H1 camera   Fujicron XC 16-50 lens     Canon EOD 6D camera     Canon EF 28-105 lens     Olympus E-M5 camera    Panasonic Lumix G-Vario 14-140mm lens